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Environmental Portrait

Houston Art Car Parade legend Mark "Scrapdaddy" Bradford

 

Mark “Scrapdaddy” Bradford with his 2012 Art Car “Mr. Green.”

Art Cars are a unique Houston institution, and I was fortunate during a recent assignment for Texas Co-Op Power to work on a story featuring the Houston Art Car Museum, and a colorful character named “Scrapdaddy.”

Mark “Scrapdaddy” Bradford is the Leonardo da Vinci of the Art Car world.  Not merely content to cover classic cars with hot glue gun affixed collections of things, Bradford actually is a unique combination of artist, welder, and engineer.  His outdoor studio, near the railroad tracks in the Rice Military area, looks like Fred Sanford's house.  His studio may look like a scrapyard, littered with projects past and present, but recycling old metal is the lifeblood of Bradford's sculptures.

If you've lived in Houston for any period of time, you've probably seen Bradford's creations around town:  Giant 20 foot armor plated Armadillos, lizards made of airline galley spoons, fire breathing creatures with legs that move, and multi-legged creatures torn from the pages of a 1950's science fiction movie.  His creations, really more moving sculpture than car, not only look fascinating, they have to work.

After photographing several of his creations in the Art Car Museum for the story, I just had to meet him.  Reluctantly, he agreed to a short portrait.  You get the impression he would much rather be welding his next piece together than stopping to pose for pictures with something from his past.

As the annual Art Car Parade rolls around this weekend, there will be around 200,000 people on hand who can't wait to see what kind of contraption he's cooked up this year.

Bradford with “Azaba” at his workshop in Houston.

“Spoonazoid”, made up of over 6000 discarded American Airlines spoons.

A detail of “Spoonazoid.”

 

Don't mess up my abs: NFL Draft portrait shoot with DJ Hayden

UH cornerback DJ Hayden, the 12th pick in the NFL draft.

I recently photographed DJ Hayden, a cornerback from the University of Houston, who surprised many by being selected number 12 by the Oakland Raiders in the first round of Thursday night's 2013 NFL Draft.  Hayden survived a freak injury: a November 2012 collision with a teammate in practice that ruptured his inferior vena cava, which is fatal 95% of the time, and normally only seen in serious car injuries.  Medical personnel rushed him to the hospital and saved his life, but his stock in the draft dropped with the uncertainty about his condition, with many pundits not even picking him in the first round.

I photographed DJ for a story leading up to the draft in Sports Illustrated, and of course we wanted to make a telling picture that spoke to the seriousness of his injury.  Normally, we might have scrubbed the shoot due to the rain and dreary weather, but we decided to press on, as the moody sky sort of went with the tone of the story.  DJ posed shirtless, baring a scar that went completely down the center of his abdomen. ( His last words to doctors before they split him open to repair his torn vein were, “Ok, just don't mess up my abs…”)

We used two Profoto 7B's on the UH practice field late in the day.  We decided to use a Plume Wafer 75 with a Lighttools grid from the right side, to just barely light the edge of DJ's face, with a little bit of spill highlighting the scar on his wrist from the many needles and transfusions he endured during his hospital stay.  We used a regular 7″ reflector with a 3-degree grid with a Cinefoil snoot to highlight the scar on the chest and abdomen.  Andres Quintero, my assistant on the shoot, operated the 3-degree grid by hand to make sure it stayed in the optimum position as we shot.

With the under-exposed gray stormy sky, the result was a dramatic portrait that told the story of what DJ Hayden had been through en route to the 2013 draft.

Inspirational bracelets made for DJ during his hospital ordeal.

UH cornerback DJ Hayden, who survived a ruptured vein to be the 12th pick in the NFL draft.

Portrait shoot with former POW Col. Bud Day

The March cover of Air & Space, with Col Bud Day on the cover.

I've had a keen interest in military aviation since childhood…when other kids were reading Curious George and other children's books, I was reading military biographies and books about World War II and Vietnam.  I remember one summer day, when I was in about 3rd or 4th grade, while returning books to our local public library, one of the elderly librarians tried to usher me from the “grown up books” to the “kid's section” on the other side of the building.  One of the other librarians quickly corrected her, “He's ok, Mabel….he just returned a book titled Guerilla Warfare and Terrorism. ” After that, Mabel left me alone.  (I actually can't remember what her name was…… Mabel just seems like the perfect name for an old lady librarian).

I thought being a fighter pilot would be cool, I even requested info on the Air Force Academy at one point during junior high or early high school.  20/400 vision, however, and projectile vomiting during a simple Cessna 172 plane ride with a friend conspired to keep me out of the ejection seat.

After photographing the Doolittle Raiders a few years ago, one of my friends from the assignment, Matt Jolley, of Warbird Radio recommended me to some of the nice folks at Wings over Houston, the annual airshow here in the Houston area. I had mentioned to him an idea about a personal project, trying to photograph environmental portraits of notable pilots.  The people with the autograph tent at WoH were nice enough to let me set up in their area and shoot simple, white background portraits of the pilots who were there signing autographs.  I was able to photograph Col. Bud Anderson (a triple ace in the P-51 during WWII), Col. Dick Cole (Doolitle's co-pilot on the WWII Doolittle Raid on Tokyo), Gen. Boots Blesse (a famous Sabre jet ace from the Korean war) and several others during my weekend there.  I was also lucky enough to meet and photograph former POW and Medal of Honor recipient Col. Bud Day.

The photos were interesting facial studies, but I lamented the limitations of the white background.  I would have loved to have captured each of them with their respective airplanes, but during mid-day sun at a packed airshow, it was just not in the cards.

The first shot we took, before sunrise on the field at Ellington.

Several months later, John Simmons, one of my buddies from the WoH event sent me an incredible video of Bud Day, eagerly climbing into the cockpit of an F-100 Super Sabre just like the one he had flown in Vietnam and going up for a flight!  The video was from the Collings Foundation, a non-profit foundation that owns and maintains not just World War II era prop planes, but also several Vietnam era jets, at….get this…..Ellington Field in Houston, Texas.  The F-100, painted just like Bud's Misty 1 Vietnam bird is one of two in the world in flying condition.

John went to work, getting us permission from Rick Harris of the Collings Foundation to use the airplane.  We made arrangements to photograph Bud, who lives in Florida, during a visit to see his son George, a former F-16 pilot, who now works as a SWA captain in Houston.

A few months later, there we were before sunrise on a warm summer morning in Houston, pulling the F-100 out of the hangar and towing it to the proper spot on the taxiway.  We had scouted a few days before, using the iphone app LightTrac to position the plane.

Bud showed up in his flight suit, with his boots and Nomex gloves on – he was definitely ready to fly the plane if necessary!  His son George also wore his flight suit.  Part of my plan was to do a nice group shot of the father and son fighter pilots together.

We started shooting before dawn – long exposures on a tripod with battery powered strobes.  Nathan Lindstrom assisted on the shoot and did a great job.  We used a Profoto 7B with a  Plume Wafer Hexoval 180 on the side, and a Wafer 100 on another 7B boomed in front of the face as a fill.

The second shot, with a Wafer Hexoval 180 and a Wafer 100 as the sun rises in the background.

We next moved onto the backlit side of the plane, and photographed the Col.'s Day together and also the elder Col. Day alone, again using the same lighting setup.  Fortunately, the sun came out for a few minutes before going back under a layer of clouds. The sunrise was beautiful!

Col. Day with Col. Day…two generations of fighter pilots.

We next moved to a shot with a long lens looking at the signature angle of the F-100 – straight up the open nose air intake.  We carefully framed Col. Day in the foreground and backlit him from each side with a Profoto 7B and a Wafer 100 on each side.  We then boomed in a  Chimera small strip bank powered by an Acute 600.   Although 87 years old, and with his body ravaged by years of torture and POW abuse, in this pose, with this light, in front of the F-100, Bud Day looked like he could still kick some serious ass.

The shot that made the cover, Col. Day still formidable at 87.

We finished with a 3/4 side lit portrait, with his glasses off, which showed off the MISTY patch on his flight suit.

The 3/4 lit portrait with “The Hun” front view in the background.

We did some group shots with the Collings Foundation folks who had so generously donated their time and effort to showcase the plane, and some USAF U-2 pilots, who had gathered during the shoot.  All USAF pilots go through survival training at the AF Survival School at Fairchild AFB, named in Col. Day's honor.  It was like watching a bunch of NBA rookies meeting Michael Jordan for the first time.

After packing up, the whole crew adjourned to a nearby Ihop for a truly memorable breakfast.  I could literally sit and listen to George and his dad tell flying stories for hours.  It was a fantastic experience.

After the shoot, I sent a few of the photos to my editor at Air & Space magazine, just on the off chance that they might be working on a story related to Col. Day, MISTY, or the F-100.  Several months later, as it turns out, there was a story on the MISTY program in the works.  They eventually decided to use one of the photographs of Col. Day on the cover of the issue, with another one running inside.

I didn't want to jinx anything, so I didn't mention it to Bud or George until the cover was posted online.  I've worked for many magazines, and covers often get pulled or changed at the 11th hour.

It was really an honor and a highlight to finally be able to make the call to Col. Day and let him know that not only was there a story on MISTY in the current issue of Air & Space, but that he had made the cover!  This was truly one of the coolest things I've been able to work on, and I'm grateful to A&S, the Day family, Rick Harris and John Simmons for making this happen.

Col. Day and Col. Day reviewing some of the photos with the me.

A little background on Col. George “Bud” Day:  He joined the Marines and fought in World War II just after high school.  He came back to the US and earned a law degree, then continued in the Air Force flying fighter jets in Korea and eventually Vietnam.   He miraculously survived a no-chute ejection the 1950's.   At an age and mission count when other pilots were retiring, he volunteered for another tour and came up with the MISTY Fast Forward Air Control (Fast FAC) program, of which he was the commander.  MISTY pilots flew low and fast over North Vietnam, marking targets including SAM missile sites for other aircraft to attack.  It was so dangerous that it was an all volunteer squadron.

During one of these MISTY missions in 1967, Col. Day was shot down and captured.  Badly hurt and barefoot, he escaped after a few days and evaded the enemy for 12-15 days, subsisting on frogs and berries, traversing miles of enemy territory and crossing the river into South Vietnam.  He was within a mile or two of an American base when he was shot twice and recaptured.  He spent the next 5 years 7 months in the “Hanoi Hilton” being tortured along with other notable POW pilots like Sen. John McCain and Admiral James Stockdale.  For his valor, he was awarded the Air Force Cross and the Congressional Medal of HonorToday he is the most decorated living service member.  After returning from Vietnam, he received 13 medical waivers and continued flying.  He eventually amassed over 8000 hours – nearly 5000 of those in fighter aircraft.    As if that weren't enough, he retired and went to work as an attorney, eventually suing the US Government on behalf of veterans who were not getting promised medical benefits and won.  As a result, millions of veterans (my late mother-in-law among them), have benefitted from the program, called Tri-Care for Life.

 

Here's a cool behind the scenes video my friend John Simmons put together of the shoot:

Photographing the Doolittle Raiders 70th Anniversary

In 2011, I was lucky enough to photograph three of the remaining five Doolittle Raiders for a story in Smithsonian Air & Space.  It was an incredible experience and was a wonderful introduction to many wonderful people in the warbird community.

Through some wonderful new friends I met on this assignment, Larry Kelley, a B-25 owner and Doolittle supporter, and Tom Casey, who manages the Raiders' appearances, I was invited to photograph the Doolittle Raiders 70th Anniversary  April 16-20 at Wright Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio.

I jumped at the chance, and was also able to bring my father (a big military aviation buff) with me on the trip to help me (and keep my light stands from blowing over!)

Larry Kelley, who owns and pilots “Panchito”, a vintage B-25 (and the one we used in the Air & Space portraits in 2011), was on a quest to bring a large contingent of B-25's to Wright-Patt for the anniversary celebration and flyover.  Through tireless fundraising and incredible determination, he was able to get 20 B-25's and their crews to Grimes Field in Urbana, Ohio  and the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson in Dayton for the event.

I had two goals for the event: first, to capture the massive gathering of B-25's for my friend Larry.  (It was the largest gathering of flying B-25s since the end of WWII!).  Second:  I wanted to photograph a group portrait of all the surviving Raiders together.

Unfortunately, just after I arrived, we found out that one of the surviving Raiders, Lt. Col. Robert Hite, was too ill to travel to the reunion.   We were however,  lucky enough to photograph the other four survivors:  Col. Richard “Dick” Cole, 96, Maj. Thomas C. Griffin, 95, Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor, 92,  and Staff Sgt. David J. Thatcher, 90.

Time was at a premium, as the Raiders had many different events and appearances scheduled, but I was able to make a group shot with them at Wright Patterson, specifically, the closed runway of the US Air Force Museum, which was temporarily turned into a ramp for 20 B-25's specially for the event.  The area was open to the public, and there were hundreds of people milling around to view the planes (Picture a busy airshow crowd).  During a brief 2-minute window, we were able (with Larry's help) to clear a path and photograph the Raiders in front of “Special Delivery”  a B-25 from Galveston, Texas with the Doolittle logo on the nose.   It was a bit unnerving to have an audience of 200 people (and a CBS Evening News crew) over my shoulder watching while we did the picture, but we got it done in record time.

Twenty B-25's on the old runway at the Air Force Museum at sunrise.

With the help of some generous ramp crew from  the USAFM we were able to secure a jetway ladder and photograph all 20 B-25's at sunrise the next day.  We then set up another portrait session at the Raiders hotel where I photographed each Raider on white and black backgrounds with old vintage leather A-2 jackets and flyboy caps.  Matt Sager, a photographer/brilliant mechanic from the Panchito crew helped out on both shoots and saved my butt with his Boy Scout preparedness.

The anniversary was an amazing experience, and it's gotten good play in a few publications in the months following the event, including AOPA Pilot magazine, which ran a series of portraits, and a cool photo I took from the end of the runway during the Grimes Field takeoff.  WWII magazine also ran the group shot we made on the field at the Air Force Museum.  I've included some of the tearsheets below.

The four spreads from the AOPA Magazine……I photographed the portraits.

This is the last spread of the AOPA Mag: I was lying down at the end of the runway with a Canon 8-15mm Fisheye as the last plane took off for Wright-Patt from Urbana.

This is the spread from WWII Magazine, published by Weider History Group.

 

Robin Roberts with her mother Lucimarian Roberts

ABC Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts, with her mother Lucimarian Roberts at the Oak Crest Mansion in Pass Christian, Mississippi in April of 2012. ©2012 Robert Seale

I am deeply saddened today to hear the news of the passing of Lucimarian Roberts, 88, the mother of ABC Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts.

I had the honor of photographing them together last spring in Pass Christian, Mississippi for a magazine article for Guideposts.  Robin and Mrs. Roberts had just collaborated on a book, My Story, My Song, and the two were being honored in their hometown with a luncheon that day.  Robin's sisters, Sally-Ann, and Dorothy were also on hand for the luncheon that day and it was great to see all of these accomplished women together.

A few days after the shoot, we found out that Robin's health problems had returned and that she would soon be undergoing a bone marrow transplant.  Her sister, Sally-Ann was a match and is scheduled to be her donor.

My sincere condolences go out to everyone in the Roberts family, and I wish Robin a speedy recovery from her next round of treatments.

(All Photographs © 2012 Robert Seale)

ABC Good Morning Anchor Robin Roberts, photographed in front of the Oak Crest Mansion in April 2012.

Portraits of Olympians

Mary Lou Retton, photographed at her home in 2008.

Since the 2012 Summer Olympics in London is in full swing, I thought it might be interesting to pull together a collection of some of my favorite Olympic sports portraits.  I've had the fabulous opportunity to photograph several notable athletes, and I'm hoping to meet and photograph more of these folks in the future.

I photographed 1984 Olympic gymnastics champion Mary Lou Retton with her daughters in their backyard a few years ago for a magazine.  Mary Lou, now in her early 40's,  is in incredible shape and is still incredibly fit and ripped.   It was a fun shoot, but it's interesting to note that at least one of them was much more interested in being an equestrian than a future gymnast.  They were all good sports, though and played along for a memorable photo.

I've photographed Steven Lopez several times.  He won the gold in Taekwondo at the Olympics in 2000 and 2004, and a bronze in 2008.  He's in London competing again on the 2012 Olympic team.

Laura Wilkinson, who won a gold medal with a horrendous broken foot in 2000, was a joy to photograph, and was willing to try several different concepts, including a waterline shot, and some slow shutter flash shots of her diving during sunset.  She also competed in the 2004 and 2008 Olympics.  Today, she is a motivational speaker and has her own foundation.

Stuart Holden, a professional soccer player, was on the 2008 US Olympic soccer team.  Although he's had a string of injuries, he's still playing professionally in Europe.

Bicycle motocross champion Kyle Bennett was on the US Olympic BMX team in 2008.

I photographed Peggy Fleming, who won the gold in figure skating in 1968.   After a breast cancer scare in the late 90's she became an outspoken advocate for breast cancer awareness and early testing.  She stays in fabulous shape (she's 60 in this photo…) with a regimen of yoga and running.

Raj Bhavsar is an incredible gymnast who won the bronze in 2008.  He was also an alternate on the 2004 team.  He has two gymnastics elements named after him, and is most well known for his prowess on the rings.  After retiring from competitive gymnastics, he is now performing with Cirque de Soleil.

 

 

 

Jeremy Lin portraits for Sports Illustrated

Jeremy Lin posing for a high flying pass on his first day back in Houston. This photo was featured as a double truck in Sports Illustrated. © 2012 Robert Seale

As Jeremy Lin was in the process of inking his deal with the Houston Rockets last week, I got a call from Sports Illustrated.  Often in sports, when a star player is traded to another team, there is a big fancy press conference to introduce the player to the media.  Usually the player stands at a podium with the new owner, professes his love for the new city and holds up a freshly minted jersey with his name on the back.  Interviews follow with all the local media outlets:  radio stations, TV stations, teenage sports bloggers, and typically, the surviving newspaper in town.

What most people don't see, is the behind the scenes photo shoots.  Put together in a rush, the sleepy player gets herded to multiple locations throughout the building to pose for the NBA, a magazine or two, the local paper, and a host of team sponsor PSA's.  It's a challenging situation, very similar to “media day” shoots that we all engage in during preseason training camps. Each photographer or news outlet gets the player for a couple of minutes and they produce the best sports portrait they can.

After I hung up with the SI photo editor, I immediately called my good friend, Rockets photographer Bill Baptist, who I knew would be doing the same gig for the NBA.  I found out that we were scheduled to be on one half of the practice court, since the other half was being used for the press conference setup.  Billy had to do two large setups, so he generously offered to have our shoot moved to the empty arena floor.  I quickly jumped at the chance and agreed that a larger room would be beneficial for all of us.  This way, we wouldn't be crossing cords or competing for space.  Plus, the last time Billy and I were that close together, I'm pretty sure he kicked my ass at tennis.

Stellar assistant Nathan Lindstrom and I showed up to the Toyota Center the next morning with a ton of gear, and made our way to the main arena floor.  An empty arena makes a great photo studio, but unfortunately, it really was empty:  as in, no floor!  Since the arena hosts a different event almost every night, the wood basketball floor was in storage – along with the basketball goals, etc.

With the help of some friendly folks at the arena, we were able to get one of the basketball goals rolled out onto the empty concrete floor.  I figured that, even if the floor didn't show, we could at least utilize the goal as a background element for context.

We put together lighting setups in two locations:  A wide angle view with the goal in the background, backlit on both sides with Profoto 8A's and  large Chimera gridded softboxes.  We used a Plume Wafer Hexoval 180 as the main light near the camera.

On the other setup, we put together a seamless paper backdrop with two different lighting setups:  a three light setup with two Plume Wafer 100's with Lighttools grids, and a Profoto Beauty dish on a boom just above the camera.  The other setup was another Wafer Hexoval 180 to the right of the camera.  We used three Profoto Acute 600's for power on the seamless setup.

Lin showed up in a brand new red Rockets uni and made his way to our set.  After shaking his hand and welcoming him to Texas, we quickly put him through both seamless lighting setups, and then standing and dribbling poses on the backlit concrete floor setup.

Part of Lin's appeal is his status as a young, springy, high-flying point guard.  He looked great flying through the air, going to he hoop, and passing in mid air to his Knicks teammates during the a few months of “Linsanity” last season.  At the end of the shoot, I asked Lin how his knee was feeling.

He said it felt great.

Great enough to jump on a concrete floor?

Sure, he said.

Ok then, let's do it.

I placed the camera, a Canon EOS1DS Mk III on the floor, and proceeded to shoot Lin leaping straight in the air with the basketball goal in the background.  He looked great – our only minor tweak being that of changing his hand positions during the jump.  At the end of the shoot, I handed him a towel, shook his hand and said thanks.  I looked down at my watch and a mere 12 minutes had passed.

He left the arena soon after and was mobbed……not by New York paparazzi, but by mouth-watering Houston real estate agents, eager to spend at least some of his 25 million bucks.

 

Fitness photography in Kodachrome State Park

Perfect form running along the rocks in Kodachrome S. P.

I recently photographed an awesome fitness instructor, Melanie Webb in Kodachrome State Park in Utah.  Melanie is unique in the world of fitness professionals in that she runs a great business combining two of her areas of expertise: wildlife and fitness training.

Melanie was originally a wildlife biologist with the state of Utah, and  later became a very sought after fitness instructor at top health clubs in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.  She combined her two loves into Sol Fitness Adventures, an adventure travel company, where she leads custom expeditions in southern Utah and throughout the world.  Not only can she guide you up the mountain safely, she can also tell you the scientific names for all the flora and fauna you'll encounter along the way.

Her company, Sol Fitness Adventures, has been featured in Outside magazine, Real Simple, and a number of other news organizations.

Although she normally leads tours  in places like Zion National Park, Arches National Park, and Lake Powell, we decided to shoot at Kodachrome State Park.  Melanie is a gifted athlete and  we made some great photos in the awesome late afternoon Utah light.

A Weekend with the Doolittle Raiders

 

Lt. Col. Richard E. “Dick” Cole with the Panchito B-25

I'm a real military aviation history buff, so it was an incredible honor when I was recently assigned to take portraits of the Doolittle Raiders for Smithsonian Air and Space Magazine.  It was especially gratifying because I was able to pitch the idea to the magazine and then get the green light to take on the assignment.

The Doolittle Raid was America's first major strike back at the Japanese after Pearl Harbor.  On April 18, 1942, Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle led an all volunteer group 80 men launched 16 B-25 bombers from the USS Hornet and struck Japan.  Because a Japanese fishing boat detected the carrier group early, the crews launched early, which weakened their already compromised range, and prevented them from landing safely on Chinese airfields as planned.  The crews bailed out or ditched their planes near the coast of China after running out of fuel.  Three men were killed in the raid, and eight more would die in Japanese POW camps.  Miraculously, most of the crews were eventually rescued and safely transferred back to the US by the Chinese.

The crew of aircraft 1. Doolittle is second from left; Cole is second from right. Check out the “Thunderbird” logo on his jacket and compare it to the one in the portrait above. (USAF Photo)

It was an incredible feat for a number of reasons – chief among them, the fact that they used Army bombers, which were not designed to take off or land on an aircraft carrier.  The men on the mission were not told the details of their target until the Hornet was steaming toward Japan.  Even though the common thought was that it would probably be a suicide mission, no one backed down and all volunteered to continue.  Although the raid didn't inflict series damage on the Japanese, it was a huge morale booster for the Americans.  The raid had an additional benefit:  the Japanese islands, once thought to be safely out of range of American attack, were shown to be vulnerable, thus Japan would need to hold back key defense forces to protect their homeland for the rest of the war.

There are five living crewman remaining from the raid:

-Colonel Richard E. Cole, copilot of aircraft #1

-Major Thomas C. Griffin, navigator of aircraft #9

-Lieutenant Colonel Robert L. Hite, copilot of aircraft #16

-Major Edward Joseph Saylor, engineer of aircraft #15

-Staff Sergeant David J. Thatcher, gunner of aircraft #7  (Thatcher is featured prominently in Ted Lawson's book, Thirty Seconds over Tokyo, which became a movie starring Spencer Tracy in 1944).

I'm always excited to photograph notable pilots, and I knew that Dick Cole, Jimmy Doolittle's co-pilot during the raid, lived in Comfort, Texas, near San Antonio.  I thought that perhaps with the 70th anniversary of the raid coming up next year, that it might be a great opportunity to photograph him with a B-25.  I thought that I could probably arrange to photograph him in Texas with help from the CAF (Commemorative Air Force).  After making some phone calls, I found out to my surprise that three of the remaining five raiders would get together at the Florida International Airshow in Punta Gorda, Florida for an airshow, and that it might be a great opportunity to photograph them together for the magazine.

Col. Cole's steady 95 year old hands on the wheel of the B-25

Upon arrival, I found out that Dick Cole was going to meet up with Larry Kelley, the owner of the “Panchito” B-25, and fly in his airplane from Sarasota to Punta Gorda.  K.T. and Syd Jones, along with Matt Jolley from Warbird Radio were crewing the plane with Larry, and were kind enough to make arrangements for me to make the flight with Col. Cole.  Space was tight inside the plane, but through their generosity, I was able to take one of their seats in the main crew compartment and photograph Col. Cole's experienced hands taking the yoke from the right seat of the B-25.  At 95, he was as smooth as ever, and it was an incredible experience to know that we were being flown around by Doolittle's co-pilot!

Larry Kelley (left), and Col. Cole (right) flying high over the Florida coast in Panchito

With fabulous support from my editor at A&S, and incredible support from this tight-knit warbird community, we were able to pull off a once in a lifetime sunset photo shoot the next day with 3 of the Raiders and a B-25 very similar to the one they flew to Japan in 69 years earlier.

Fellow photographers and good friends Brian Blanco and Chip Litherland assisted me on this dream  assignment.  Chip and I used Lighttrac, an Ipad app, to determine the optimum position of the plane at sunset.  Once we determined our position, Larry graciously provided his airplane as our iconic backdrop and allowed us to tow it into the perfect position for the evening shoot.  The airboss and ground crew at the airport actually shut down an active taxiway to provide us with the perfect angle, far from the other planes on the ramp.  Tom Casey, who runs the Raiders charity organization, and manages their appearances, delivered our hero subjects at the right time, and arranged for us to borrow an authentic copy of Cole's WWII era leather jacket.  K.T. Budde-Jones and Syd Jones, who work with Stallion 51 in Kissimmee, Florida, pitched in and answered a million of my dumb questions.  Matt Jolley helped us out as well, and videotaped the shoot for Warbird Radio, a fabulous internet radio site, with tons of interviews and information  on pilots and planes.

Doolittle Raid

We photographed the group together in their Doolittle insignia blazers, and then photographed each Raider individually.  Col. Cole looked great in his WWII era A-2 leather flight jacket.  We kept the lighting simple, utilizing an easy corner lighting setup with two softboxes. For Griffin, we used a Plume Wafer 100 and some ridiculously low shuter speeds to try to capture what little ambient light we had remaining.  Because we had a cloudless sky, it quickly became very dark, and we photographed SSgt. David Thatcher  in almost complete darkness.  Chip backlit Panchito's nose and canopy with the Wafer 100, and we used a large Hexoval for Thatcher's  face.  We used Profoto 7B's and Profoto Acute 600 battery powered strobes, since we were out on the taxiway far from any sources of AC power.

SSgt. David J. Thatcher, gunner of aircraft 7

One of the highlights for me, was a bit of audio on Matt's video of the shoot.  Dick Cole is a very laid back, humble and classy guy.  If you met him on the street, you would never know that he was a famous pilot or war hero.  Matt asked him on camera – ‘what do you think of all the fuss?'  Cole quickly came back with, “the water-boarding is next?”

The lead time on the story was several months, but they've finally been published and now I can share them here.  It was a real treat to photograph these heroes, and it wouldn't have been successful without the help of my Florida colleagues and good friends in the warbird community.