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Texas Photographers

Panoramic Portrait Photography for ExxonMobil Annual Report

Cover of the ExxonMobil Summary Annual Report.

I've been really fortunate to work with ExxonMobil on their annual report photography and other corporate photography for the last ten years or so.  It's a great gig, and I've been able to document photographs of people and assets for their shareholders all over the world.   I'm particularly proud of the work we did on this year's version.

Cover of the ExxonMobil Financial and Operating Review.

Over that time, the books have been fairly consistent, with a vertical format layout, and often featuring traditional spreads of sprawling petrochemical complexes at dusk or at night.  Although there's always been quite a few people photos as well, this year was quite a departure in that the focus was completely on employee portraits.  The marching orders were to create panoramic portraits of employees utilizing technology in their work environment.  We've all seen the typical oil and gas photography, and it was fun to take it in a different direction and focus on the super smart people that make the company work.

Some spreads from the ExxonMobil Annual Report.

The format of the book was horizontal this time, to maximize the effect of the panoramic photos over a full two page horizontal format spread.  The layouts were also adorned with quotes from the employees and helpful stats about the company.  In the end, they used a mix of traditional environmental portraits, and some reportage working shots.

During our travels, we created most of the photographs with the 50 megapixel Canon EOS 5DS, and in several instances, we composited several frames to create the panos.  We carried Profoto lighting, using the B-2 and the B-4 extensively.  We also used some LED light panels on some of the photos.  The cover shots and spreads I photographed were taken at sites in Texas, New Mexico, Louisiana, Belgium, and Angola.

It was a break from the usual approach honed over many years, and was both a challenge and an honor to work on.  I ended up with both covers (Both the Summary Annual Report, and the F&O), and a number of spreads.  Hoping to do some more great content for them in the future.

(Ed. note:  although it says “2017 Annual Report”, it is actually released around May of the following year (2018) with figures from 2017, so it's really not as old as it looks…).

More examples of our panoramic portraiture below: 

 

Creating a football concussion Photo Illustration

I was commissioned recently to create an  photo illustration for Houston Methodist Hospital Foundation’s Annual Report  Photography for a story on concussions in high school football players.  This is a big issue not just for the NFL, but also in youth sports.

I think that originally we were just going to shoot a simple portrait of a young athlete in football gear, but after giving some thought to the issue, the art director and I collaborated on a few other more illustrative ideas.

A few years ago, I had photographed Matt Schaub, the Houston Texans quarterback at the time for Methodist's Leading Medicine publication.   We did a couple of different versions:  one was using a projected background created by a computer and an LCD projector of MRI brain scan imagery and another photo showing medical illustrations of nerve synapses in the brain.

I thought we might appropriate the brain projection idea, but add some other elements to it: a silhouette of a generic kid in a football helmet this time to keep the illustration anonymous; and a multiple exposure strobe effect to look like a violently shaking head.  Our art director helped us in researching a suitable stock photo of the brain that we could use in the projector.

After doing some testing in the studio (do we need a white helmet or black helmet, for instance?), and ordering some props (youth sized football helmet, jersey, and shoulder pads) we booked a young male model for the shoot.

(If we were truly going to be literal here, the concept probably should have been a brain bouncing around with multiple exposures/blur INSIDE a sharper helmet image, but I quickly decided that would have just been a blurry mess and would not have been as easy of a read as the brain inside a shaking helmet.)

This is an early shot, showing the strobe on the background (gelled orange), the projected image on the helmet foreground, but without the multiple exposure/multiple strobe on the background effect.

The key was to tripod the camera for the “brain exposure”, keeping it absolutely still for this exposure provided by the projector, and then with the shutter open, firing multiple strobe bursts (with strobe lighting the background seamless only) with the model's head in slightly different positions to show the silhouetted helmet with movement.  Although I liked the randomness of the head movement in each photo, we finally settled on zooming the lens smoothly and evenly to create the multiple strobe head images.

The intention was to do this just like the film days, creating the entire photo in camera, and we were successful with this for the most part.  Some of the images admittedly had some “unintended brain movement” from the long exposure of the projector (I think it was around 1/4 to 1/8 of a second), so we ended up retouching a couple of the selections with a “sharper brain” from another exposure.

Changing the color of the gel on the background strobe created some cool multi-colored silhouettes during multiple pops of the flash. I think it's especially interesting where the colors cross over and mix. Not a new idea, but fun to try nevertheless!

We used a Canon 5DS, and tried it with two different methods:  leaving the shutter open and firing the Profoto strobe manually, and also with the multiple exposure feature engaged.  We also tried two different methods to create head movement:  having the model shake his head around during the multiple exposures; and also leaving the model still and zooming the lens during multiple exposures.

We even tried this with different gels on the background strobe, but in the end my favorite was a monochromatic look with just the brain projection in color.

Another example with different gels and changing the color balance.

I prefer this monochrome version with lots of exposures created by zooming the lens.

Guideposts cover shoot with Boston Marathon bombing survivor Rebekah Gregory

Rebekah Gregory, who was injured in the 2013 Boston Marathon explosion

I recently had an inspiring shoot with Boston Marathon bombing survivor Rebekah Gregory for Guideposts Magazine.

Gregory, then just 26, and her five year old son Noah were spectators standing only 3 feet away from the bombs near the finish line when the explosions went off on April 15, 2013 at the Boston Marathon.  Her legs absorbed a lot of the bomb’s impact and shielded her son, likely saving his life.

Gregory and her son were both injured, and spent time apart in two different hospitals.  After months of trying to rehabilitate and rebuild function in her injured leg, and scores of surgeries, she made the brave decision to amputate, and hasn’t looked back since.

A single mom at the time of the bombing, she’s since gotten married and had another child.  She recently wrote a book, “Taking my Life Back: My Story of Faith, Determination, and Surviving the Boston Marathon Bombing,” with co author Anthony Flacco.

Rebekah Gregory, who was injured in the 2013 Boston Marathon explosion, photographed with her family at her home in Texas.

We photographed her at her home, and part of the mandate for the Guideposts cover was a powerful portrait of her on white seamless.  Luckily, her home featured a garage with a giant ceiling, so we set up our “studio” in there.   We used a Plume Wafer Hexoval 140 boomed into the center, directly over the camera for the white background stuff. We used three Profoto B-4 battery powered lights as our light source (and we later added an Acute 600 Air also).   My good friend Misty Rockwell did a great job with makeup.

We did some “happy” smiling photos, but I really wanted her to look resilient, and was more drawn to those tough and strong poses.   Although it didn't make the cut, we created some really strong tight portraits with a classic fashion cover lighting setup of Rebekah in a cool gray workout fleece, and used a small, lower light source below the camera as well as the Hexoval over the camera to really make the eyes pop.

Rebekah Gregory, with her son Noah, who were both  injured in the 2013 Boston Marathon explosion.

We also made some environmental portraits of her with her son in the driveway, and a family photo in the back with her husband and new baby, but my favorite shot might be her son hugging her on the white seamless, both of them with their eyes closed.

Rebekah is a class act who is using her platform as a survivor of this horrific event to promote and encourage others.   You can’t spend time with her and not leave inspired to do better in your own life.

Rebekah Gregory, who was injured in the 2013 Boston Marathon explosion, photographed at her home in Texas.

Rebekah Gregory, with her son Noah who were both injured in the 2013 Boston Marathon explosion, at their home in Texas.

Robert Seale speaking at Asian American Journalists Association convention

I'll be speaking at the 2018 Asian American Journalists Association annual convention at the Marriott Marquis, 1777 Walker St, Houston, Texas, Room 2734.

In addition to the regularly scheduled lineup of writers, editors and TV correspondents, longtime AAJA member Darrell Miho has organized an additional educational curriculum for still photographers over the three day convention.  I'll be doing a lighting talk from 11:00-12:30 Friday, August 10th.

Here's the list of speakers and subjects for the still photo program:

Thursday, August 9

11:00am Lisa Krantz, San Antonio Express-News:   Photo Stories

4:00pm Richard Tsong-Taatarii, Minneapolis Star Tribune:    Images from the Rohingya Crisis

Friday, August 10

9:00am Karen Warren, Houston Chronicle :  Baseball and sports photography

11:00am Robert Seale, Houston Commercial photographer:   Lighting for Impact

2:00pm Laura Elizabeth Pohl, freelance photographer:A Long Separation. Families Divided by the Korean War

Saturday, August 11

3:00pm Chang W. Lee, New York Times:2018 Winter Olympics and Paralympics

4:30pm Portfolio Reviews/Photo Critiques

The Photo Hangouts are FREE to all AAJA18 attendees! If you're not attending the convention and interested in just attending the Photo Hangouts please call or text Darrell Miho at 626.975.6349 or email us at aajaphoto@gmail.com

Trade magazine covers for CDW

A recent cover of BizTech from a DNA testing lab.

Like most commercial photographers, we do a lot of work that is not necessarily viewable by the general public.  Even though the work might be viewed by thousands of people, it's not something you might see on a billboard or on the magazine rack at Barnes and Noble.  This B2B corporate photography work can take many forms: a multimedia presentation within a corporation, an annual report to a corporation's shareholders, a sales brochure, or in some cases a specifically targeted magazine with a carefully chosen audience.  These are called “trade magazines” in the photography business, and they often lead to fun and interesting assignments.

CDW has been producing a group of these magazines for quite some time, and I've been fortunate to shoot for them quite a bit.  Their technology solutions business is targeted to education, business, government, and healthcare customers, so they have a magazine for each industry titled (logically enough) EdTech, BizTech, StateTech, and HealthTech.

Over the years, I've been able to create cool environmental portraits of doctors, cops, and business executives.  I wanted to share a couple of covers from some recent issues of the magazines.

For BizTech, we photographed a high tech DNA testing facility.  The place was just as you would expect, a slightly mundane lab with lots of test tube vials being sorted by techs in lab coats, but with few good photo opportunities, as most of the techs were working at tables facing a wall.   Ugh!  I became fascinated by a large machine on one end of the lab…..it was a big blocky thing, but had a window looking through to either side.  Inside were vials in banks on both sides, and in the center was a little robot arm, doing it's thing – retrieving vials according to an automated program and moving them to be tested.  I decided it would make a cool photo if we could get some light inside, but it proved fairly difficult.  We ended up placing the subject on one side of the machine, booming a small strip bank above the machine, and then cross lighting the vials from each side in VERY tight quarters (with a slight green gel added), which also outlined the subject from behind.  It was really tricky, since I was shooting through a window on the other side and trying to avoid window fog and condensation on the glass.

For the StateTech cover, we photographed local constable Alan Rosen for a story on body cameras.  (It just so happened that our PR guy for the job was a former colleague, the famous Houston Chronicle political writer and generally great guy Alan Bernstein!)  We picked an abandoned building with lots of character not far from my studio in downtown Houston and shot several setups with Rosen and a group of his deputies all showcasing their new body cameras.  Most of the shots were horizontals and intended for an inside spread, but towards the end of the shoot, I remembered one of my old editor's mantras:  “No matter what you're doing, no matter what the assignment is, ALWAYS GET A HEADSHOT!”  That voice haunts me some days, but it's really good advice.  Your assignment might be to shoot a panoramic cityscape with an architect in the foreground, or an athlete in his home, or whatever – but remember that you'll be the designer's best friend if you give them a tight portrait they can run on page 3 or 4 of an article, or on a table of contents page, or in this case, if the story budget changes and your story ends up on the cover!

A recent cover of Constable Alan Rosen for StateTech.

Robert Seale featured in new ASMP collateral

One of the new ASMP postcards (Photo by Robert Seale)

This is definitely one of those Wayne and Garth “I'm not worthy…” moments,  The American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) have featured me, Houston commercial photographer Robert Seale, in their new collateral pieces (brochures and postcards).  Wow!

The American Society of Media Photographers is the premier trade association for the world’s most respected photographers. ASMP is the leader in promoting photographers’ rights, providing education in better business practices, producing business publications for photographers, and helping to connect clients with professional photographers. ASMP, founded in 1944, has nearly 7,000 members and 39 chapters.  ASMP's “Find a Photographer” feature on the national ASMP website is a wonderful tool for connecting photo editors and art buyers with photographers in a given area.  Despite the word “media” in the title ASMP is not a press photographers organization.  ASMP members are typically commercial photographers who work in advertising photography, corporate photography, as well as those who shoot for magazines.

“I'm not worthy!….” – sandwiched in with some big names inside the new ASMP brochure (cover photography by the great Stephen Wilkes)

These pieces are distributed by mail and also as handouts at professional photography seminars, workshops, and events as recruiting tools.  I'm humbled and honored to featured alongside some of the most notable photographers in our profession past and present, including many virtual mentors who continue to inspire my work today, like Richard Avedon, Dan Winters, Arnold Newman, Mark Seliger, Herb Ritts, Albert Watson, Joe McNally, Pete Turner, Jay Maisel, Gregory Heisler, Walter Iooss, and a host of others.

An inside spread in the brochure (photo by Robert Seale)

Major thanks to our executive director Tom Kennedy, a former Director of Photography at National Geographic, and a major force in the photo world, who continues to represent our organization and who leads the fight for working photographers every day.

Chuck Norris put me in a headlock!

Actor and martial artist Chuck Norris on the family's Lone Wolf Ranch in Navasota, Texas.

When the Boogeyman goes to sleep at night, he checks his closet for Chuck Norris.

There is no theory of evolution. Just a list of animals Chuck Norris allows to live.

Chuck Norris has counted to infinity – twice.

There is no chin behind Chuck Norris' beard.  There is only another fist.

I've loved reading these “Chuck Norris Facts” for years.  It was pretty awesome when we actually got to meet the man in person recently when we photographed Norris and his lovely wife Gena for Houstonia magazine.

Actor and martial artist Chuck Norris and his wife, Gena Norris, have developed a new private-label bottled water manufacturing company called CForce Bottling Company on the family's Lone Wolf Ranch in Navasota, Texas.

Part of the hook for the story was that Gena had recently fired up a full blown water bottling plant on their giant ranch property near Navasota to bottle water from the natural aquifer they found on their property.  The plant is a state of the art facility and there is a charity component to their H2O endeavor.  You can read more about it in the Houstonia story here.

Since we were there in sort of the middle of the afternoon on a sunlit partly cloudy day, we needed a big light and lots of power for the outdoor shots.  We used a Profoto B-4 and a Plume Hexoval 180 for most of the outdoor shots.

Although we shot the bottling plant and did lots of still life shots of water bottles, the highlight for me was getting to make a cool environmental portrait of the former Walker Texas Ranger star and Gena on his awesome Texas ranch.  We also shot in their horse stables, which had amazing light.  Gena was a professional model, and the two of them together have a lifetime of experience in front of the camera and were just wonderful subjects to photograph.  I don't think I've ever dealt with two nicer, more accommodating people.

Actor and martial artist Chuck Norris in beautiful natural light in the horse stables on his Texas ranch.

Actor and martial artist Chuck Norris in the horse stables at his Texas ranch.

I couldn't resist taking a romantic silhouette of Chuck Norris and his wife, Gena in the horse stable.

As we were loading the gear back into our vehicle, he came back out of the house and gave everyone in the crew a paperback copy of a Chuck Norris Facts book.  I think he gets a big kick out of the cult hero status from all these “facts.”

Before we departed, Norris was telling us a story about going to Iraq to visit troops there.  He was standing at the front of a long line of soldiers eager to meet him, shaking hands, posing for photos, signing autographs and such.  When one of the soldiers (who was a particularly big strong guy) got to the front for his turn, the conversation went like this:

Soldier:  “Ok, kick me in the chest!”

Chuck: “I'm not going to kick you in the chest…”

Soldier:  “No, really, I want you to roundhouse kick me in the chest!”

Chuck:  “Come on, I'm not going to kick you in the chest.”

The soldier wouldn't let up, and was just dying to go back to the barracks and tell all his buddies that he survived a Chuck Norris roundhouse kick to the chest…..the line was starting to grumble from the delay.

Finally, Norris quickly grabbed the soldier, and in one quick motion the (at the time) 70 year old martial arts veteran spun him around backwards and put him in a choke hold and dropped the big guy to the floor like a sack of potatoes.

At this point all the other military guys standing in the autograph line, full grown men trained in combat, were yelling like little kids, “Put me in a choke hold too!  Put me in a choke hold too!”

Of course….after hearing this story, what do you think I did?

“Put me in a choke hold!  Put me in a choke hold!”

Here's the layout of the article by (then) Houstonia art director Tanyia Johnson. She has an excellent eye for design, and I'm forever in her debt for sending me on such a cool assignment!

 

More Oil and Gas Corporate Annual Report Photography for ExxonMobil

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The cover image was taken from a helicopter off the coast of Angola.

I'm a little late in posting this, (the 2015 annual reports were actually released during April of 2016), but I wanted to share some of the published work from the last ExxonMobil annual report.

Although we shoot all kinds of things:  lab technicians, testing, construction sites, high-tech control rooms, etc., for some reason this particular year, they featured several aerial photos of maritime facilities and ships.  These are always challenging to shoot, and we go through a lot of safety training including HUET (Helicopter Underwater Egress Training) just to be able to work out of aircraft offshore.  Basically, if you've seen the old Richard Gere movie, “An Officer and a Gentleman”, it's very similar to that.  You're dunked several times in a mock helicopter fuselage in a large swimming pool upside down and you have to unbuckle and swim out through a window.  Fun stuff!

The cover image was shot of the coast of Angola, and the spreads are from shoots in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Jubail, Saudi Arabia, Baton Rouge, USA, Qatar, and from the Gulf of Mexico.  We shoot thousands of photos in these various locations, and there are many rounds of editing, so it's gratifying when you finally get to see some of the work in print.  I'm thankful for wonderful clients, and cool opportunities to travel the world, and I can't wait to share some for he work from 2016 after it's released.

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An ExxonMobil engineer in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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A sunrise image of an LNG tanker in Qatar.

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A chemical plant in Saudi Arabia.

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A ship unloading at the Rotterdam refinery in The Netherlands.

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A tanker undergoing sea trials in The Gulf of Mexico.

BuzzFeed photo shoot with Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone BilesWith the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio coming up, I thought this might be a good time to write about a shoot we did earlier this year with US Olympic gymnast  Simone Biles.  Biles, who trains in Houston, is 4’9” tall and a three time world all around champion.

The media landscape is changing these days. This is the kind of shoot we might have done for Sports Illustrated once upon a time, but instead, this time we were commissioned by Buzzfeed to do this sports portrait shoot.

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone BilesIn the months leading up to the Olympics, the notable competitors (like Simone) have huge demands on their time. In addition to their normal training schedule, they are also doing interviews with various writers and television programs, and posing for photo shoots with not only media outlets, but potential endorsement partners. They are seriously busy, and it’s hard to stay focused on their training with all these various demands on their time.

To that end, we knew that we would have very little time to work with her, and that everything would need to be prepped carefully so as not to waste any of her time.

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone BilesThe photo editor wanted a classic, quiet portrait and sent several examples of gymnasts/fitness models on concrete walls and muslin backgrounds. Since Simone’s family-run training center was brand new and very modern, we knew we weren’t going to get the muted, moody industrial concrete wall background. We took a big muslin backdrop instead , and did a classic one-light portrait that stayed within the spirit of the comps.

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone BilesWe also prepped a secondary setup on a balance beam to capture some rim-lit “action” shots of Simone doing her thing. For this we used big tall C-stands with two Profoto B4’s and one Profoto 7B. (Note to self: always be careful when setting up lights in a gymnastics facility….one false step and you might find yourself neck-deep in a Nerf-cube-filled landing pit….not that this happened to me or anything….).

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone BilesWe mixed in some available light practice shots (I was able to dust off my usually dormant Canon EF 300/2.8!) of Simone and her coach working together to round out the assignment and give the photo editor lots of options.

The backdrop session went very fast…about 6-10 minutes. The balance beam shot went fast too, but not by choice. The coach shut us down after just a few frames saying the strobes were a distraction to the other young gymnasts training there. Even though we prepped them for what we were doing, you really can’t argue in that situation with the person controlling your access…..you just have to say yes ma’am and move on. I knew we had some nice frames already, ( thanks in large part to Simone’s perfect technique on the first few frames – thanks Simone!), so we pivoted and quickly moved on to available light practice shots.

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone BilesThe new family-run gym, World Champions Centre in Spring, Texas is an incredible facility.   Simone’s parents and brother work together managing the facility and they do it with class and good humor. We were surrounded by a steady stream of youngsters training at various stations who I’m sure were hoping to someday be the next Simone. A “WARNING” sign near the lockers read, “CHILDREN LEFT UNATTENDED WILL BE SOLD TO THE CIRCUS.”

Buzzfeed recently ran an extensive story and collection of the photos here. I thought the story and presentation turned out great! Because of the virtually unlimited space they were able to run many more photos than you would typically see in a normal magazine layout.  We in the newspaper/magazine journalism world have been talking about this advantage for years….it was nice to finally see a media outlet exploit the web format to full potential.

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

USA Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles

All photographs © 2016 Robert Seale/All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

Photographing Tim Duncan – the greatest power forward of all time

Tim Duncan, photographed for the Sporting News on June 27, 1997. ©Robert Seale/The Sporting News

Tim Duncan, photographed for the Sporting News on June 27, 1997. ©Robert Seale/The Sporting News

I covered Tim Duncan during countless games, including three San Antonio Spurs NBA Finals titles in 1999, 2003, and 2005. I probably took thousands of photos of him, but on the occasion of his quiet retirement, I picked a few out just for this blog.

I first met and photographed Tim Duncan on literally his first full day in San Antonio. He was drafted in Charlotte at the 1997 NBA Draft and flown to San Antonio, and then early in the morning of June 27, 1997 at Trinity University I photographed him for The Sporting News, my employer at the time. I had a crazy schedule back then, and had just flown back from Vancouver, and then been dispatched straight to San Antonio the night before for the Duncan portrait.

My Filofax page from June 1997. Things were busy at TSN back then!

My Filofax page from June 1997. Things were busy at TSN back then!

There were three shooters there that day: the Spurs photographer (and all around classy guy) Clarke Evans, Patrick Murphy Racey, who (I think) was shooting for NBA photos at the time, and me. I think Clarke was the only one with an assistant, Patrick and I were there alone.

This “photo day scenario” was not an uncommon practice: you’re scheduled for a shoot with some big time pro athlete, and the team schedules several different media outlets for the same time frame. The athlete might be on set for half an hour, but each photographer gets 5-6 minutes on their own individual background , and you’re literally shooting a couple of feet away from the other photographers in the same room. I think Clarke and Patrick both had seamless setups, so I went outside on the balcony of the conference room we were in and set up my lights out there.

What I remember most is how quiet and childlike Tim was back then. He had a friend with him from college, and I remember them sitting together between the shots and chatting about nerdy guy stuff: knives, swords, or something.  I could totally picture them playing Dungeons and Dragons. I wondered how many 20- sided-dice might fit in his gigantic hand. It was really innocent, and there was no ego or bravado. I remember none of us being able to force much of a smile out of him. He was completely uninterested in being a star – he just wanted to play….and I don’t think he ever changed in the next 19 years.

An overhead remote shot of Tim Duncan. © Robert Seale/The Sporting News

An overhead remote shot of Tim Duncan. © Robert Seale/The Sporting News

The best part of covering the Spurs during the NBA Finals was the camaraderie among fellow basketball photographers, all of whom travel together for weeks during the playoffs like a big traveling circus. Everyone works long hours, but after the gear gets put away, there were wonderful late night meals at Mi Tierra or drinks in the hotel hospitality suite with guys like Andy Hayt, John McDonough, Andy Bernstein, Bob Leverone, Andrew Loehman, Ronald Martinez, and a host of others.

Tim working his way out from under heavy Pistons coverage. © Robert Seale/The Sporting News

Tim working his way out from under heavy Pistons coverage. © Robert Seale/The Sporting News

The worst part of covering the Spurs in the NBA finals (at least the first one in 1999…): hanging strobes and remotes in the ridiculously high catwalks of the God-forsaken Alamodome. The elevators only went to the middle mezzanine, and each pack/head/long lens/etc. had to be hoisted up with a rope from the top row of the nosebleeds.   I used eight 2000 w/s Dynalite packs and heads, and about 750-1000 feet of zip line to connect the strobes for the playoffs there. (If they ever tear the building down, I might visit just to spit on the rubble).

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A Sporting News cover of Tim Duncan from 1999. (Photo by Robert Seale)

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Sporting News cover featuring The Admiral and Tim from 2003. (Photo by Robert Seale)

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A cover from the Spurs 2005 NBA Finals championship. (Photo by Robert Seale)

After I left the Sporting News in late 2006, I had the good fortune to shoot Tim for a couple of covers while on assignment for Sports Illustrated. In 2013 I photographed him with his teammates Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker during a quick “studio” shoot in a parking garage. We had no more than 5 minutes to shoot the setup, and I had several lighting/background variations to run through. I had a little help, as Tim’s kids climbed all over me during the shoot….his son was hanging piggyback on me making faces, and his daughter was holding up “bunny ears” behind my head to try to get him to crack up. It was awesome!

A 2013 SI cover with the Spurs "Big Three." (Photo by Robert Seale)

A 2013 SI cover with the Spurs “Big Three.” (Photo by Robert Seale)

In 2015, we did another SI cover, this time for the NBA Preview issue. We had about 2 minutes with Tim and LaMarcus Aldridge. The concept (which SI carried through to several teams), was to have the newcomer to the team doing a signature move or pose of the team veteran. In Tim’s case, everyone knows he has a ritual in which the referee tosses him the ball, and he hugs it closely for several seconds before tossing it back to the ref for tip off. We managed to get LaMarcus to do the same move with Tim standing with him. There was no levity this time….just Tim with his usual deadpan expression, almost challenging you to try to take a “heroic” image of him.

A 2015 NBA Preview cover with Tim and Aldridge. (Photo by Robert Seale)

A 2015 NBA Preview cover with Tim and Aldridge. (Photo by Robert Seale)

The shoot was quick, but I took Tim aside at the end and gave him a large print from that first shoot we did together, more than 18 years earlier.

“Wow, man….thanks.”, he said….and then he disappeared quietly.

Timmy performing his pre game ritual before tip off. © Robert Seale/The Sporting News

Timmy performing his pre game ritual before tip off. © Robert Seale/The Sporting News

 

(Photos are © The Sporting News, or © Robert Seale.   Feel free to link back with attribution, but please don't steal my pictures.  Thanks.)